Paper Pinter

Paper Paper Pinter consists of four short plays by Harold Pinter: Victoria Station, Family Voices, One for the Road, Mountain Language, in the form of the theatre of shadows, such as Karagoz theatre. Two actors animate paper puppets, with the battery lamps behind the canvas. This unusual performance is produced by the informal group ‘Scena CARINA’ comprising two professional actors Rade Ćosić i Vladimir Tešović, one film director Marko Kostić, one visual artist/creator of paper puppets Aleksandra Zdravković and one art director/producer Nataša Milović.

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The plot

Victoria Station – during one night in London a taxi driver cannot move from his car. He cannot remember the main bus station in London – Victoria station, nor the eponymous symbol of British Empire. His colleague, the Controller, cannot understand the situation when ‘everything stops’. The Driver reveals that this client is a sleeping young female with whom he has “fallen in love” (possibly “for the first time”) and from whom he refuses to part, imagining that he will even marry her and that they will “die together in this car”.

Family Voices – The young man, new in a city, tries to find his place in it. He writes letters to his mother, but he cannot find the way to show his truth feelings to her any more. He cannot tell her about his real position in the hostile place where he now lives. The play deals with the problem of identity of the people who are not prepared for the traps of the so called ‘civilized world’.

One for the Road – a man is listening to the music and waiting for his next victim – Victor. He talks about candour in politics while he is torturing Victor’s wife and child. Victor is being punished for his disobedience to the system of a totalitarian state (which could be everywhere).

Mountain Language – the system of state control is allowed to make mistakes. But before that, system has a new rule – nobody can speak any language, except the language of the capitol city. Inspired by what really happen to Kurds in Turkey, Pinter wrote Mountain language as an agit-prop play about the irrationality of the ‘civilizing process’ which is based always on irrational rules and injustice. Harold Pinter says:

There are at least ninety countries that practice torture now quite commonly – as an accepted routine. With any imprisonment, with any arrest, torture goes with it. And on both sides of the fence, Communist and non-Communist. In fact more on what’s called ‘our’ side of the fence – I refer particularly to Central and South America – than on what’s called ‘their’ side of the fence. Certainly in terms of actual physical brutality, by which I mean murder and rape, which are the given facts in One for the Road However, the distinction between then and now is that then, in 1957, the concentration camps were still an open wound which it was impossible to ignore, whereas now it’s only too easy to ignore the horror of what’s going on around us. There’s too much of it. (A Play and its Politics, a conversation between Harold Pinter and Nicholas Hern published in Pinter’s One for the Road, Grove Wiedenfeld/New York, p. 8)

Paper Pinter is the first production on the Scena Carina – the first stage production for alternative performances. We called it Scena Carina (because the customs authority is quite nearby). We discovered this small local community in New Belgrade and we would like to produce there and create a most exciting theatre in Belgrade. Paper Pinter is our first step.

Note: every Saturday at 20h

Venue: Narodnih heroja street 30,

Buses: 65, 74, 71, 72, 75, 78, 18.

Contact: 065 28 74 809, burainadiranje@gmail.com

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~ by scenacarina on November 1, 2011.

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